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ESSE QUAM VIDERE (To Be Rather Than To Appear)

Dates

Fri, Jan 18, 2019 — Sun, Jan 27, 2019

Type

Exhibitions

Admission

Free

Location Accessible

Beauchamp Gallery

167 King Street East

Reception

Yes

KEDD Night: Mon, Jan 21, 6-9pm


Daily Hours

MonMonday

9:30 am

5:30 pm

TueTuesday

9:30 am

5:30 pm

WedWednesday

9:30 am

5:30 pm

ThuThursday

9:30 am

5:30 pm

FriFriday

9:30 am

5:30 pm

SatSaturday

9:30 am

5:30 pm

SunSunday

9:30 am

5:30 pm

Description

Rectification, Part A
The Adinkra is a guide to the cultural symbols of the Asante people (Ashanti Kingdom) believed to have their origin from Gyaman, a former kingdom in today’s Côte D’Ivoire. The Ashanti Empire was an Akan empire and kingdom in what is now modern-day Ghana. According to an Asante (Ghana) legend, Adinkra was the name of a king of the Gyaman (Nana kofi Adinkra). Adinkra was defeated and captured in a battle by the Asantes for having copied the “Golden Stool,” which represented for them absolute power and tribal cohesion. He was finally killed and his territory annexed to the kingdom of Asante. The tradition had it that Nana Adinkra wore patterned cloth, which was interpreted as a way of expressing his sorrow on being taken to Kumasi the capital of Asante.
Adinkra also means ‘goodbye’ or ‘farewell’ in Twi the language of the Akan ethnic group of which Asante is a part. It has therefore been the tradition of the Akan especially the Asante to wear clothes decorated with Adinkra symbols on important occasions.

Symbolism/Significance
The Adinkra symbols express various themes that relate to the history, beliefs, and philosophy of the Asante. They mostly have rich proverbial meaning since proverbs play an important role in the Asante culture. The use of Proverbs is considered as a mark of wisdom. Other Adinkra symbols depict historical events, human behaviour, and attitudes, animal behaviour, plant life forms, and shapes of objects.

This collection is the merging of Adinkra symbols: in simple plain motif they are transformed into an eclectic visual journey that depicts a level of expressionism before the modern movement of expressionism began in the 20th century in Germany.

By The Fire Side; The Ineffable, Part B
This series of the collection is influenced by the concept of “gameo” – “gem” – “marriage.” It is a fusion of two distinct elements into one. It is the beautiful marriage between Heaven and the Earth, the line between realism and surrealism, the awesome connection between God and His offsprings, the true source of love and hate, good and evil, the amalgamation of the African culture and the Western culture. This are the beautiful narratives that source life. The collection is purposefully designed to disguise stories, symbols, secrets from a casual viewer while revealing a hidden revelation to the knowledgeable spectator.

 

Yaw Tony is a designer and artist based in Toronto. He trained in architecture, graphic design and fine art, and work in those areas as well as product design and creative consulting. His work has been exhibited in Germany, Spain, Netherlands, the US, Toronto and has been published widely in Cent Magazine, Making Africa: A Continent of Contemporary Design, and Designlines.

Yaw Tony is the founder of Elohim Studio (Architectural and Design Studio) and Life Liveth In Me (textiles and visual communication projects).

“I break all colours rules to define all colours rules.” –Yaw Tony

www.yawtony.com


This is part of KEDD Night, one of many events happening in the King East Design District on Monday, January 21, 6-9pm.

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Participants

Yaw Tony